Your Complete Pre-Winter HVAC Checklist

Before winter sets in and your days get colder, make sure your HVAC unit functions properly. After all, you wouldn’t want to be trapped with a failed furnace when winters get chillier and temperature plummets.

A detailed HVAC checklist will keep you safe and warm. It involves a few things that you can check yourself and others for which you’ll need a skilled professional. If you aren’t sure what to add to this list, here are the top things to do:

Check and Clean the Filters

Your HVAC needs thorough dusting before you resume its use in winters. It involves cleaning the filters before reactivating the unit. During the fall, the filters and ducts collect a lot of dust and grime when they are not in use.

You may clean the filters with a damp cloth and replace them every 3-6 months to prevent contaminated air from entering your home. When cleaning the filters, look deeply for any leakages too. If you find any, call your HVAC contractor immediately to fix the issue.

Start the Thermostat and Check the Heater

Even before you start carving the pumpkins for upcoming holidays, remember to switch your thermostat from cooling to heating. It will set the temperature a bit higher than the current room temperature. When you turn the thermostat on, listen closely for the sound of heat kicking in.

If it doesn’t make any noise and connections look secure, check the power source to see if the unit is turned on. And call a professional if it still doesn’t work because there may be an issue with the blower, heat pump, or furnace fan that’s better handled by a certified technician.

Check the Furnace

Add furnace checkups and tune-up to your HVAC checklist to keep your unit working efficiently. Clear the clutter around the furnace and make sure it has a few feet of open space on all sides.

When checking the furnace, use a flashlight to see if any critters or rodents have made their home inside it. If so, clean up the area or call a professional to do the chore.

Check the Humidifier

When you run the furnace, it may dry out the air. Hence, keeping the furnace humid is essential in the winters. That’s what a humidifier does. If you have a humidifier in your unit, clean its water panel and check that it has no mold growth or debris inside it.

Also, replace the carbon monoxide detector batteries to protect your unit from any unexpected furnace mishaps. Change the batteries every year and test the unit for its proper functioning after the battery change.

Winterize the AC Unit

In your HVAC checklist, make it a point to winterize your AC unit against winter elements. It will save you hundreds of dollars spent on AC repairs when summer gets back.

If your HVAC doesn’t have a heat pump, cover the condenser, so falling icicles won’t damage it. Cover the fan with a board instead of wrapping it in a plastic tarp that keeps the moisture inside.

Don’t Forget Draught Proofing

Though it may seem inconsequential, draught-proofing your home is essential for the proper functioning of your HVAC system. Any cracks or spaces in the walls, windows, and doorways can let the air escape and impede heat circulation inside the home. As a result, your unit might end up overworking itself.

Check and Clean the Heat Exchanger

Your HVAC checklist isn’t complete unless you add regular brushing and vacuuming the heat exchanger. However, this task should be entrusted to a skilled professional who can look for any cracks or leakages.

Check and Clean the Ducts

If the heating ducts gather dust or get damaged, your system will be overworked, increasing the utility bills and harming the air quality. Hence, inspect the ducts before winter starts and look for dents, mold, mildew, punctures, or broken wires. Though you can examine it yourself, call a professional for repairing or replacing the ducts properly.

Install a Programmable Thermostat

You can customize the temperature settings in your house with a programmable thermostat. It will allow setting the temperature back by 7-10 degrees F when you are asleep or not at home.

Experts also suggest keeping your house warm at 68 degrees during the day or whenever you’re at home. So, if you don’t have a programmable or Wi-Fi-enabled thermostat yet, it’s time to call your HVAC contractor to install one.

Change the Direction of Ceiling Fans

Mostly, the ceiling fans have a switch that allows you to change your blades’ direction to rotate clockwise. This way, the fans will push warm air down in the room and circulate the heat from the furnace throughout your house.

Check the Chimneys

The chimney’s flue is another item to inspect in your HVAC checklist. Make sure that it is properly closed to prevent drafty air. Sometimes, the chimney may harbor carbon buildup that needs to be cleaned well. Call a certified professional for chimney tune-ups and cleaning before you build the blaze in your fireplace.

Check the Igniter Switch

If the igniter in your HVAC system isn’t working, push the reset button. However, if it still doesn’t switch on, check the breaker or call a technician to examine the igniter switch and circuit breaker in your house.

Schedule a Professional Tune-Up

You can’t overlook the importance of a professional tune-up and inspection in your HVAC checklist. You may fix and check the smaller issues, but system faults, boiler issues, replacements, and draught-proofing are some specialized tasks best managed by certified professionals. Schedule a pre-winter inspection with your HVAC contractor to ensure that your unit is ready for the season.

Winters bring a lot of change to your outside temperature, your home, and your lifestyle. Cleaning your spaces to improve air quality is essential alongside this HVAC checklist to stay warm and protected inside your home.

With a professional examination, you can find and fix minor issues before they compound into a serious problem down the road.

Air Balancing: 7 Ways to Avoid Hot and Cold Spots in Your Home

Did you know that the average American spends 87% of their lives indoors? This means that indoor comfort is of the utmost importance when you’re in your home.

This is typically achieved through your air conditioning and heating system. However, things can go wrong, which can really decrease your comfort.

To help you out, here are 7 ways to do air balancing in your home. That way, you can avoid hot and cold spots.

1. Check Your Air Filters

All HVAC systems have air filters. These are there to eliminate impurities in the air so you breathe in good quality oxygen.

However, over time, they can become clogged. This process can be accelerated if there’s been something detrimental in the environment, such as a forest fire nearby.

It’s important to either clean and/or replace your air filters regularly. This is one of the most important things to do when it comes to HVAC air balancing. Not only will this provide you with better quality air more frequently, but it’ll also help prolong the lifespan of your HVAC system.

And most importantly, it’ll get rid of hot and cold spots, plus keep your utility bills down. In fact, it can reduce your energy consumption by up to 15%!

2. Check Your Registers

The registers are what block or allow air to flow from your HVAC vents. One key piece of advice is to never completely close all vents, as this can cause other issues to occur.

In general, if you’re experiencing hot weather, you should completely open the registers on the 2nd floor. For the 1st floor, you should close them partway. Because hot air rises, during hot weather, you want to push as much cold air into the top floor to make up for that extra hotness. 

On the other hand, if you’re experiencing cold weather, you should close the registers partway on the 2nd floor. And on the 1st floor, you should open the registers all the way.

3. Get Good Clearance on Your Vents

It can be hard arranging your furniture and items within your house. But you just might have to rearrange once again.

Go through all your rooms and check that nothing is covering any registers. For example, you might have some furniture that’s blocking the vents. As a result, this can cause your HVAC system to work a lot harder than it needs to.

In general, you should allow for at least 18 inches of space for your vents. If this isn’t possible, you should consider purchasing a magnetic air deflector. These items have the power to redirect airflow so you get the best air circulation possible.

4. Check All Seals

One of the main things that can create cold spots in your home is leaky seals. This can definitely be the culprit if you live in an older home and haven’t performed maintenance in a while.

Go around to all your windows and doors and see if you can detect any drafts. Bring a lit candle with you to better visualize any leaks, as the flame will flicker or even go out if there are any.

Once you’ve found the leaks, seal everything up properly. This should fix the cold spots in your house.

5. Install Window Coverings

This HVAC tip is for addressing hot spots in your home.

During the summer, your windows can be a huge source of heat, since they can create a greenhouse effect. If you don’t have any drapes, shades, or blinds, this means you’re constantly receiving sunlight through these pieces of glass. In turn, your home will quickly heat up, especially the direct areas the sunlight’s hitting.

A simple way to fix this is to install window coverings. Not only will these block the heat better, but they’ll also add to the aesthetics of any room. Plus, you can shut them to get some privacy if you have lots of foot traffic outside.

6. Move Electronics Placed Nearby Thermostats

As you may already know, electronics generate lots of heat whenever they’re in operation. If they’re anywhere near your thermostats, this can give them false readings. As a result, your air conditioning might be on for longer than necessary.

Not only should you move your electronics if they’re near thermostats, but you should also adjust your vents. This will allow the hot air from your electronic equipment to be removed from the room more efficiently.

7. Try a 2-Degree Offset

This is one of the HVAC tips that will only work if you have a separate thermostat for the upstairs and downstairs.

As the name suggests, you’ll have a difference of 2 degrees between the floors. The difference will depend on whether you’re experiencing hot or cold weather, because again, hot air rises.

If you’re having hot weather, set the thermostat on the upper floor 2 degrees lower than the bottom flower. And in cold weather, you’ll want to set the thermostat on the bottom floor 2 degrees lower.

Both methods account for the hot air rising, which will help to make temperatures more even throughout your home. This works similarly to how opening and closing the registers works as well.

Try These Air Balancing Tips

If you’re getting hot and cold spots in your house, then you should give our above air balancing tips a try. However, these may not always work.

In that case, you should give Briggs HVAC a call. We can come out to your property to service your HVAC system. They can do professional air balance testing, which involves adjusting both the intake and output accordingly. As a result, that’ll have it up and running smoothly to keep you comfortable in your home.

Would you like assistance with your HVAC system? Then schedule an appointment with us now. We also have emergency services available.

A Detailed Guide on the Different Types of HVAC Systems

If you’re in the market for a new heating and/or cooling system, you may be overwhelmed by your choices. Fortunately, you’ll find all the help you need in the following HVAC system buying guide.

The comprehensive list below describes all types of HVAC systems that are commonly used today. You’ll learn all about how they work and what features they provide. We’ll also tell you the ideal type of residence/climate that each system is suited for.

Furthermore, we’ll touch on the installation cost and efficiency of all these systems as well. Discover which HVAC system is right for you with this guide.

Types of Cooling Systems

There are about 8 main types of residential AC systems, each with pros and cons of their own. Here is a brief overview of their features and advantages.

Central Air Conditioners

The most common AC system for houses is the central or whole-house air conditioner. These systems include one indoor and one outdoor unit. 

The refrigerant in the indoor evaporator unit absorbs heat from the indoor air. The cooled air is blown to each room in the house through the ducts. Then, the indoor unit pumps the refrigerant, with the heat it absorbed, to the outdoor unit.

The outdoor compressor unit compresses the refrigerant to cool it back down. Then it sends the cooled refrigerant back into the house to start the cycle over again.

These are usually incorporated into one with the home’s furnace or heating system. These systems are convenient, effective, and inexpensive to install. But they aren’t quite as efficient as some of the other systems.

Window Units

Window units work the same way as central AC. However, they are comprised of only a single unit that is half inside and half outside the building, installed in a window.

These are even more common than central AC because they are the system of choice for most apartment complexes. They are usually cheaper to install than central AC since they include no ductwork.

But they are mostly only effective in very small or single-room dwellings like a studio apartment. To cool multiple rooms in a large home would require more than one window unit.

Through-the-Wall Air Conditioners

These are essentially the same as window units except they are installed into a wall of the building instead of a window. This type of unit may be installed as an alternative when there are no suitable windows in which to install a window unit.

Portable Air Conditioners

Another single-unit system that works like a window AC unit is the portable air conditioner. The main difference is that it can be picked up and moved to other rooms in the house at any time. 

These are the cheapest air conditioning solution. But they’re not quite as convenient as they sound.

Like window units, they still require a window to let out the heat they pull from the indoor air. This means you’ll have to seal the open window area around the exhaust port somehow. The process is a lot more involved than simply placing it in a room and plugging it in.

Swamp Coolers

Swamp coolers or evaporative coolers use ancient technology to cool air with water instead of refrigerant. These units pull hot indoor air through water-moistened pads that cool the air down.

These are cheap and surprisingly effective, but only in very hot and dry climates. Naturally, the water in the cooler humidifies the air while cooling it. Thus, swamp coolers are a bad choice for already humid climates.

Types of Heating Systems

Now, we’ll look at the most common heating solutions for homes. Since heating is generally a much simpler process than cooling, there are fewer types of heating systems than cooling systems.

Furnaces

This is the most common residential heating system. It uses electricity, heating oil, or natural gas to heat indoor air.

Then it blows the air through the ducts. If the building also uses central AC, the furnace will use the same ducts. 

Boilers

Instead of circulating heated air, boilers circulate heated water. The water in boilers works a similar way (but in reverse) to the refrigerant in central AC units.

The heated water or steam is pumped to radiators throughout the house where they give off heat. This cools the water down. So, it is pumped back to the boiler where it can be heated again.

Space Heaters

These small heaters are available as portable units or permanent installations. They simply use gas or electricity to generate heat, warming the immediate area. Each of these units is only useful for heating one small room.

Combination Heating and Cooling Types of HVAC Systems

Finally, there are some systems that use a single unit to both heat and cool the building. All of these use very recent, and very efficient, technology.

Hybrid Systems

These systems are so named because they are powered by both electricity and fossil fuels using hybrid technology. This is said to make them more energy-efficient than other cooling systems.

In summer, they work like central AC to pull heat from your indoor air and blow cooled air through a network of ducts. In winter, they reverse the process, pulling heat into the home from outside.

Geothermal Systems

Geothermal systems work almost the same as hybrid systems, except they use no fossil fuels. Also, instead of pulling heat from the outside air to heat your home, they pull it from a geothermal coil installed far underground. In the same way, in summer, heat is pulled from your home and transferred to the earth surrounding the coil.

Mini Split Systems

Lastly, ductless mini split systems are becoming more and more popular because of how efficient they are. Rather than using one large system with a series of ducts to reach every room in the house, mini splits use multiple small systems and no ducts.

Each indoor unit works like the indoor evaporator unit of a central AC system. They pull heat from each room in the house individually and transfer it to a single outdoor compressor unit. This process is reversed to heat the home in winter. 

What makes this so efficient is that each system is only responsible for cooling one room. This requires a very small amount of energy.

Plus, if one side of the house tends to be warmer, only the units in that half of the house will run more often. Central AC would keep trying to cool the whole house simply to reach half of it. Also, the lack of ducts eliminates the possibility of duct-related energy loss.

Furthermore, each room has a separate thermostat. So, each room can be set at different temperatures. Units in empty rooms can be shut off.

However, despite their efficiency, they can be very expensive to install if you need many indoor units for your home.

Keep This Guide

If you’re currently shopping for heating and cooling solutions, don’t forget about this guide. Also, if you have a friend who is wondering about the different types of HVAC systems, please share this page.

Now, click here to learn about The Various Parts of an AC Unit and What They Do.

Parts of an AC Unit and What They Do

Air conditioner (AC) units monitor and regulate air temperature inside your home, but have you ever wondered how? Although an AC is a comprehensive system of components, it’s not too complex. We’ll break down the major components for you.

Evaporator Coils

Evaporator coils are used to deliver cool air into your home during hot summer months. The process by which air is cooled by the evaporator coils is as follows:

  • Air from inside your home is forced over the evaporator coils
  • Since heat flows naturally from hot to cold, the heat from the air inside your home is absorbed by the refrigerant inside the coils
  • The refrigerant changes state from liquid to vapor or gas
  • Cooler air is forced back into your home

The efficiency of the evaporator coil relies on how much refrigerant is available. Too little refrigerant results in operation failure. When too much refrigerant is available, it results in a parched evaporator and causes more liquid to transfer into the compressor.

Compressors

In order for heat to transfer back to the outdoors, the temperature of the refrigerant must be higher than the outdoor temperature. The main purpose of the compressor is to pressurize the refrigerant gas or vapor, thereby bringing it back to its liquid form. In order to disperse heat from the system, the air outside your home then cools the refrigerant.

The compressor runs on a motor and is therefore susceptible to mechanical problems if not properly maintained. It can stutter, overheat, and eventually burn out. If there are unusual sounds coming from the compressor, or if the AC isn’t keeping your home as cool as you’re used to, it could be because of a failed compressor.

Condenser Coils

A condenser coil is the opposite of an evaporator coil, as it contains hot liquid for heat transfer. Located outside of your home, it receives the high pressure, high-temperature refrigerant from the compressor.

The refrigerant inside the condenser coil releases heat energy with the aid of the condenser fan, which blows air over the coils. As the heat energy leaves the refrigerant, the cooler liquid then flows to the expansion valve.

Since the condenser coil is located outside of your home, it’s important to keep it clear of falling leaves, branches, or other debris. Ignoring regular maintenance could result in poor AC performance or electrical failure.

Expansion Valves

Located between the condenser coil and evaporator coil, the expansion valve removes the pressure from the condensed liquid refrigerant. As the pressure is removed, the temperature is decreased and the refrigerant changes from a liquid to a vapor form.

Keeping your expansion valve in good working order will ensure that your system stays efficient. A faulty expansion valve can result in your AC blowing warm air or frost, or it may keep your compressor working too hard.

Refrigerant

Refrigerant is a special fluid that changes states from liquid to vapor at convenient temperatures for the AC cycle. As it moves through the AC’s cooling tubes and copper coils, it absorbs heat from the inside of your home and transfers the heat energy outside.

One of the most common problems that can happen in the AC system is leaking refrigerant. Signs that refrigerant is leaking include:

  • Water puddles form around the compressor, evaporator coils, or condenser coils
  • Lower than usual airflow from the vents
  • The air inside your home feels warmer
  • It takes longer to cool down the house

If you notice any of these signs, it’s important to call a certified AC technician. At Briggs HVAC, we can fix small problems caused by leaking refrigerant in order to save your AC system from much bigger problems down the road.

Putting it All Together

The return vents inside your home force hot air into the AC system. As the hot air flows over the evaporator coils, the cold refrigerant absorbs the heat energy from the air.

After moving through the evaporator coil, the refrigerant discharges to the compressor. By pressurizing the refrigerant, the vapor inside the compressor is heated up even further. The hot vapor then flows through the condenser coils to facilitate heat transfer to the outdoors.

The refrigerant then cycles back over the expansion valve, depressurizing and cooling down. The AC system then performs the same heat absorption process over and over again.

Briggs HVAC: The Heating and Cooling Company

For professional residential HVAC sales and repair, contact us today. We service, maintain, and install heating and cooling systems to keep your home comfortable all year long.

Prepare for Winter with a Fall Maintenance Check

When the warm days of summer give way to the crisper weather of fall, it’s a sign you should be getting ready for winter. Winter proofing your home keeps things running smoothly reduces energy waste and keeps your family toasty warm even on the coldest days. Here are our helpful tips to help prepare for winter with a fall maintenance check.

Air Leak Check 

Over the years, your home starts to show its age. This often means it can develop many sneaky ways for warm air to escape. Some of the most common places for air leaks are your windows and doors, as well as your attic. With the first signs of fall, perform an air leak check to look for spots that might interfere with your home’s heating:

  • Look at each of your windows for potential air leaks particularly around the frames and sill. These areas can be caulked inside and out with the proper seal for interior and exterior use.
  • Open and close your windows and see if they look like they could use some new weather stripping to help improve the seal. You will notice issues in any areas that pull away from the frame when the window opens and closes. A good test is to slide a dollar bill or piece of paper into the window and shut it. If you can pull it out, time for new weather stripping.
  • Do the same tests and inspection for any exterior doors. You can caulk gaps and add weather stripping to improve the seal.
  • If you have vines on your home overlapping siding, look for gaps. Pull the vines away and seal the gaps to prevent moisture and cold air from entering the walls.
  • Check your attic for signs of gaps along the roofline as well as dampness. Seal any obvious gaps using the appropriate caulking.

Look for Mold

Mold is a very dangerous, unhealthy intruder in your home. Because your home tends to remain closed up for the winter months, you really want to avoid sealing yourself in with mold. Look for mold in common areas where moisture occurs such as your bathrooms, sinks and windows. Use a strong mold spray to remove it and prevent further mold from growing.

Roof and Gutters

Make sure your gutters are debris free to ensure melting snow and ice have somewhere to go. Clogged gutters can lead to serious issues including giant icicles that can cause harm to your home not to mention put your family at risk for falling ice. As well, ice that builds up in the gutters can cause ice dams, which are very risky for causing roof damage and ultimately leaks. You’ll also be better prepared for thaws that occur in the spring to avoid water damage.  

It’s always a good idea to have a roof inspection. If you are comfortable on a ladder and with heights, you can do a once over of your roof to look for issues such as damaged or missing shingles. Otherwise, you can call in a roofing expert to look for areas in need of repair.

Furnace Maintenance Call 

The last thing you need is a furnace breakdown in the frigid winter. Set up a maintenance call with your HVAC specialist so they can do a complete check to make sure it is in top shape. You can do some preliminary checks by turning on your furnace to make sure it works, and that the thermostat allows you to turn the heat up and down. You can also do a quick clean up around your heater like vacuuming up dust. This is also a good time to change your filters to allow your furnace to run more efficiently. Your HVAC pro will handle the rest making sure all parts are in working order and letting you know if repairs or a replacement are required. Remember, if you want to reduce your energy bills, you need to make sure your heater is humming!

Inspect Duct Work

Your ductwork can also experience leaks that can lead to energy challenges. Wherever you have exposed ducts look for signs of issues such as loose screws, missing or loose duct tape and ducts that appear to be disconnected. Check your duct returns and supply ducts for debris and give them a quick vacuum to keep them free of obstructions.

Water Heater Check

If you want to improve energy efficiency, you can also add a water heater blanket and foam pipe insulator to help you save on water heating.

These fall maintenance tips will get your home winter ready so you and your family will avoid issues when winter makes its first appearance.

If you would like more information on fall maintenance for your HVAC system, contact our team of experts today. 

5 Tips for Buying an AC Unit

With spring here and summer approaching, you can expect a marked rise in temperature. While spring temperatures can often be comfortable and feel “just right,” once summer gets into full swing, the temperature indoors can get hot and uncomfortable.

For your comfort and the safety of pets, children, the elderly, and even electronics in your home, it’s important to maintain cooler temperatures indoors, and air conditioning is the best solution. If you’re buying an AC unit for the first time, or you haven’t been in the market for a while, what should you be looking for? How do you make sure that the AC unit you’re considering is the best one for your needs? We’ve got five great tips to help you out!

Decide on Coverage

From the start, you’ll need to make a big decision. Do you want full coverage of your entire building or partial coverage for select rooms? For example, if you want an entire home to be cooled, then you’ll likely need a centralized air conditioning solution. So, buying an AC unit that connects directly to an existing furnace and ventilation system will allow you to make use of the vents that already go into every room.

On the other hand, if you’ve just finished an attic, and you want to keep it cool but don’t want to add expensive new vents to that room, you can try a different option. A mini-split solution or even a window AC unit is a better fit to cool smaller or particular spaces.

Size Matters

Buying an AC unit is also about making sure that you get a model that suits the square footage of the space. Get a unit that’s too powerful, and you’re paying for electricity that you don’t need to be using every time the unit turns on. Get a unit that doesn’t put out enough power for the building, and it will work longer than it needs to, which results in higher electric bills as well.

To avoid missteps, get an experienced AC technician to evaluate the space you want air conditioning for. They will measure the square footage and then make a recommendation. You want the right unit for the right amount of space in order to treat the air effectively and manage your spending.

Think About Your Length of Stay

If you are upgrading your HVAC system because you’re getting ready to sell your property, you’ll want to buy an AC unit that makes your home attractive but doesn’t eat into potential profits. However, if you’ve just moved into a home for the long term, and you’re buying an AC unit, your priorities are different. You’ll want to consider efficiency, coverage, different types of models and technological advancements, trends, and of course, cost. The length of time you plan to stay in a home plays a role in how you decide to invest in your new AC unit.

Look at the Rest of Your Home

If you’re buying an AC unit that’s new, you’re likely to get a big boost in your cooling efficiency. But you can get an even bigger boost if your home itself is also more energy-efficient. Evaluate your windows, have your roof looked at, and see whether your walls or your roof would benefit from new insulation to prevent that cool air from leaking out.

You’d be surprised at how much more you can save if you get the rest of your home in shape for the summer and winter months.

Pick the Right Installer

The most important decision you can make after selecting and buying an AC unit is to install it professionally. Buying an AC unit with high efficiency will only benefit you if the installation is done correctly. If you hire the cheapest installer available and ignore a poor reputation or bad reviews, you may end up paying for that choice in the long run with higher energy bills than you should be paying.

Always make sure that the installer you hire is reputable, experienced, and willing to come to your home and evaluate it personally so that you get a custom solution. Contact us today, and we’ll be happy to provide you with a consultation and estimate so that you can decide how you want to cool your home this summer and enjoy both comfort and cost-efficiency.

How to Pick the Best HVAC Company in North Virginia

The HVAC company you select must be qualified to complete the work in your home. Only by taking on the research process and reviewing the local marketplace can you find the right company for your home’s requirements. Our team at Briggs HVAC has decades of experience in the HVAC marketplace, and in this latest post, we’re explaining our tips for choosing the best HVAC company.

Read Customer Reviews Online

When you’re going through the research phase to find the best HVAC company to help you, make sure you read customer reviews online. Customer reviews can tell you more about how the company’s team completed their work inside the home. The review will likely point out if the company’s staff was late to the property and when issues occurred during their work. Or, reviews can confirm that the company is reputable and performs high-quality work. Ensure you read a number of reviews from different sources.

Ensure the Technicians Are Licensed and Insured

Make sure that the technicians the company employs have full insurance and have completed the licensing for HVAC work in the area. If the technician and their employer do not have full insurance, you may find you’re responsible for any damage that occurs to your property or any injuries they sustain during their work.
When a technician is licensed, it’s proof that they have the expertise to handle complex HVAC work, helping give you confidence in their competency.

Discuss the Pricing Before Coming to an Agreement

The pricing for your HVAC work should be discussed with the HVAC company before moving forward. Ensure that you know exactly how much you will be charged for the work to be completed.
Also, ask about the potential for any additional charges resulting from the work on your home. For example, will the company’s technicians ask you before completing further work outside the current scope? Once you have a final agreement regarding the quoted price, you can then move forward to discuss the project in greater detail.

Try to Avoid Choosing Solely Based on Price

A common mistake many homeowners make when selecting an HVAC firm is choosing simply based on price. That can lead to a number of issues with the quality of the workmanship. Price can be a key factor in your decision-making process, but it shouldn’t be your sole basis for choosing a company. It should be one of many factors that go into hiring the best HVAC company for work in your home.

Find Out How You Can Help Their Team

In some cases, the homeowner may be able to help the HVAC company complete their work effectively. For example, you may be asked to ensure the work area is clear of obstacles before the technicians arrive. You might also be asked to ensure that pets and small children are kept away from the area for the duration of the project. Taking these small steps can often make a significant difference in the quality of the completed work.

Discuss the Project in Detail Before They Begin

Make sure you have an idea about the type of work the company will be completing in your home before they begin. Often, homeowners simply let the HVAC team enter the property and complete their work without fully knowing the type of repair or installation work the company is completing within the home. That can mean companies get away with poor workmanship or mistakes during the working process. Try to find out as much as possible before the work begins, and make sure you ask questions if you’re unsure about any aspect of the process.

Discuss the Warranty

When you choose an HVAC contractor, the contractor should provide you with some form of warranty that states they will fix any errors that occur during their work. The warranty is designed to give you peace of mind when working with the contractor. It also protects you in case the contractor doesn’t follow-up with you after you find a problem with their workmanship. Ask for a copy of the company’s warranty before the work begins, and ensure you’re comfortable with the wording in the document.

Turn to Our Team at Briggs HVAC for Quality Repair and Installation Work

Looking for the best HVAC company for home repairs? Look no further. Our trusted team at Briggs HVAC has a comprehensive understanding of HVAC systems, including installation and repair requirements. We work with clients throughout McLean, Fairfax, and Great Falls to deliver exceptional HVAC services. If you have an issue with the HVAC systems in your home, you can turn to our team for a quick response! Call us today for a consultation.